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Nýlendu  Icelandic Sheepdogs

When looking for an Icelandic Sheepdog puppy, I would recommend a visit to ISAA Approved Breeders

ISAA is the only AKC recognized parent club for the Icelandic Sheepdog and only USA partner club for the Icelandic Sheepdog International Cooperation (ISIC)
 

ISAA Approved Breeders have signed and pledged to uphold the ISAA breeders/stud owner agreement, the Breeders Ethics Statement and they follow the breeding recommendation of the home country.   All ISAA Approved Breeders do health tests on their dogs before breeding and health screening information is verified by ISAA BRCC.(Breeding Review and Compliance Committee)  They don't breed young Icelandic Sheepdogs and they support the preservation of the breed.


I would also recommend a visit to the Temperament page at the ISAA website to see if an Icelandic Sheepdog puppy might be a good match for you and your family.



Looking for an Icelandic Sheepdog puppy

Beware

There are breeders out there that only breed "because they want puppies" without any consideration whether the puppies will meet the standard or not, sometimes with no health checks or even known health issues.
 
Breeders that are breeding for one trait such as color when type temperament and health are more important.

Breeders that don't choose breeding material carefully and don't breed to the standard, are only producing dogs and not taking breeding seriously.


Please notice that being an "LIfetime ISAA members" may or may not be ISAA Approved Breeder.  Look for an ISAA Approved Breeder Logo for an approved breeder.

Statement of health checking on breeders website without links or verification, may or may not be up to date.







Puppy buyers should look for health screening information before buying a puppy. Health information can be found at the ISAA website for ISAA approved breeders, and/or on breeders website. CERF tests certifications are for 12 months only, meaning that a CERF test should have been done within the 12 months prior to breeding. 

All breeding dogs should have PennHIP and/or OFA tests and those tests should be listed along with the CERF information.  Information about the puppy’s pedigree should be easily found along with pictures of the parents.

What to look for

Do your homework!

By doing your homework prior to purchasing your puppy, you will lessen your risk of getting an inferior example of the breed and minimize any unnecessary stress, heartache or possible expenses due to health issues.

Please use the resources of the ISAA club to start your search, thoroughly investigate a breeder before you buy a puppy.  Buying a Registered Purebred Icelandic Sheepdog, you may have to wait as they are not always readily available and breeders will sometimes have a waiting list.


While you may be tempted to rush in and buy the first puppy you see,  remember your new furry friend will be with you for the next 10-15 years and this is a long time to regret a mistake.

The first respects the country of origin in all matters. They are breeding the dog according to the country's standards and respect that the dog is an Icelandic heritage. They truly love the breed and care about the dog.
 
The second camp knows better. They are changing the breed to fit what they think is best and toss aside the ideas of the home country, disregard them and have no respect for the breed or Iceland itself.

There are two camps in the ISD world

The Icelandic Sheepdog is slow to mature

While some breeders don't like to wait for the dog or bitch to reach the age of two before they begin breeding, it is important to follow the guidelines recommended by the Icelandic Sheepdog International Cooperation's (ISIC) Breeding Committee.  These standards were developed based on research of the ISIC countries in cooperation with the scientific community in support of the continued health of the breed.

Breeding seriously and correctly

A breeder should only breed to a correct type of parents and strive for better offspring than both dam and sire. See interview with breed expert, Sigríður Pétursdóttir